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Tag Archives: civil liberties

Email to Dave Taht, CEROwrt

One of the reasons I wrote “Flash Netgear WNDR 3800CH Router with TORONTO CEROwrt 3.10.50-1” is that the dev/user area at CEROwrt seemed to have only a few users; although, dev was very active.

CeroWrt  3.10.50-1 is ready for wider use —  if a non-coding user like me is installing it. I tinker but I don’t  hack code; I’m an end user. And, as full of errors as the story below might be it’s still one of a half-dozen stories on old blogs about Cerwrt that might familiarize people who search Google for information about this latest version of Cerowrt.

DD-WRT users are a group who might benefit from it, at this point in its development, but there are others like me who aren’t on those forums but might be encouraged to try it, with help.

I’d like to see a broad based users group come together. As a system this version of Cerowrt is pretty sweet. I’m as excited about it as i was when i first saw Linux many years ago. Users help each other. I want that help. I’m not an early adopter. I come in later when a technology is just ready to be baked in but too soon for the timid.

Could the site make a more visible area that doesn’t seem as formidable. I don’t belong w/ the devs, and other people w/ these routers don’t feel comfortable w/ the devs, we kind of feel in the way. There are a ton of these Chinese routers out there w/ buggy stock firmware but nice not-too-dated hardware. Can you refer me to anyone who might want to enlarge this User Area?

Thanks, also for the link on civil liberty, George Carlin style.

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“I think the case against Auernheimer is deeply flawed, and that the

principles the case raises are critically important for civil liberties online.”

 

“In a blog post Thursday, Orin Kerr, a professor from the George Washington University Law School, said he is stepping in to help Auernheimer due to concerns over the length of his sentence and the manner in which the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA) was applied in the case.”

AT&T HACK

A few days ago, I read about “Weev” Auernheimer hacking AT&T to reveal a deep flaw. He did it for the challenge and a notoriety. He was hacking for fun not profit. He’s going to jail. Why?

Why are our brightest minds wasted in jail? A rapist gets one year and a non-malicious hacker gets three to four, and another altruistic one is driven to take his life, and yet another one, a talented Texas journalist rots in jail. It’s more than unfair. It’s wasteful. And, heart breaking.

I’m not a hacker. I tinker. Yet, our society is so backward, and so under-educated about technology that I might be lumped into that category. I tinker, like so many others. To say that I hack is like saying that singing Karaoke is the same as performing a musical virtuoso. What I like to do is write or at least think about writing. It’s probably what Barrett Brown likes best, too — what he thinks about while in jail for hacking, which he probably didn’t know jack about, what he knew about was writing and investigative journalism.

Technosociofile, Subspecies of the Nerd

Years ago I got fascinated by a new thing, a bulletin board, run by a skinny teenager who worked at Walmart. I don’t remember his name; I remember he killed himself, though. One day I had someone to share a hobby the next I had no one. I used to talk to him about computers when I went there to shop. I’d look him up. One day he wasn’t there, and they told me they found him by the wood pile near the shanty he lived in. He’d shot himself. He was a Technosociofile, not a terribly understood subspecies of the nerd. Seems they are the most vulnerable.

Brown, Swartz, and Auemheimer

In a small way that’s why I feel so bad for activist, Aaron Swartz, altruistic JSTOR hacker at MIT who committed suicide while under Federal indictment “facing decades of prison”, and to some degree, I feel bad for Andrew ‘Weev’ Auernheimer in what is considered “Federal overreach”, for the AT&T hacking. And then there is Barrett Brown, who got hold of a story that his journalistic personality wouldn’t allow him to let go.

Cyberwarfare Discussion

Don’t get me wrong I don’t like or support malicious hacking but hacktivism is another story. It often doesn’t come tied up in a nice bow with manners and etiquette. It’s comes in the package of a sometimes obsessive, reclusive, inquisitive mind who just wants to know if they can climb one more level in the game. And when they are caught, nowadays, lately, the crime often does not fit the punishment. I’m not saying all who hack and get caught should go unpunished I’m saying recently this is beginning to look like a witch hunt.

Is this an era we will look back on as a destruction of the best minds of the early twenty-first century, the ones who are self taught, self-motivated, the possible geniuses who might protect our country against cyberwarfare through exposing holes in the technology-Internet-infrastructure? I’m saying let’s have open discussion, let’s have oversight in sentencing, and let’s understand the difference between malicious destruction and hacktivism. It’s a very fine line but democracy has always allowed us to tread that fine line delicately.